Nigel Cheshire

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Latest Articles from Nigel Cheshire
The iPhone story that interested me the most though, was Bubba Murarka's tale of his service experience with Apple. Here's someone who clearly likes the product, but the whole experience is let down by the support model. I had a similar experience when I returned my malfunctioning Macb...
From the many reports of software glitches this week, (including an outage at all-the-rage social networking site Facebook), I decided to focus on a couple of interesting (to me, anyway) stories that have one thing in common: speed. The world of Formula One racing is not familiar to ma...
I'll be speaking at SYS-CON's Real-World Java One-Day Seminar in New York City next Monday, August 13. Despite the fact that it's August, it looks like they have lined up an interesting panel of speakers for the day, including sessions by Yakov Fain on using Flex with Java (that'll be ...
SYS-CON.TV just posted an interview that Roger Strukhoff did with me at JavaOne last month. While there's not too much you can say about software quality in 9 or 10 minutes, I did drop a few hints about what we are working on here at Enerjy, which we are pretty excited about. I'll star...
The folks at Stelligent entered the brave new world of vidcasting with an interview with Levent Gurses, previewing his presentation at the Better Software Conference. Levent talks about the key Eclipse plug-ins that help track code quality metrics. In particular, he makes a couple of k...
Infoworld ran a story yesterday on comments made by Microsoft's Chief Research and Strategy Officer, Craig Mundie. 'The problem is,' said Mundie, 'that software development is an important endeavor but it has not matured as an engineering process, it's still an art form.' He was respon...
A quick thought for a Friday afternoon. Mary Jo Foley reports at ZDNet that Microsoft is starting work on the Kitchen Client version of windows. Among the features Microsoft is planning to make part of its forthcoming kitchen computing environment are a family calendar, recipe center, ...
David Seruyange pointed me to a great presentation by Yahoo! Javascript Architect Douglas Crockford on software quality. At least, 'Quality' is the title of the presentation, but in fact Crockford gives a wonderful history lesson, showing how we got to where we are today. This is a 48-...
When I worked for IBM, back at the start of the e-business phenomenon, the management of our group made a very uncharacteristic decision for the time (and as it turned out, a very wise decision). None of the e-business technical staff went on-site; all work was performed within IBM's o...
'Evidence of decay (large defect backlogs, no documentation, no code reviews) remains in the system for a reasonably long period of time. Quality oriented engineers who work on the project feel more vulnerable and begin to withdraw. They become less willing to intervene to maintain sof...
Having a particular interest in data visualization (more on how that relates to what we are doing here later), I was browsing around the Digg API visualization contest today. The many different approaches to building a meaningful representation of a dynamic data set made me realize tha...
Never Mind the Quality, Feel the Width' was the title of a British TV sitcom in the late 60's (yes, I really am that old), which has nothing to do with Java software development. Or does it? The more I talk to people about the issue of Java software quality, the more I am reminded of t...
I was in a meeting with a customer earlier this week, discussing some of the changes that we see in development teams that start a metrics program and begin to measure the results. I used the phrase 'change in the culture and behaviors' of development. In most cases, the skills are the...
The obvious thing I see here is an education issue. TDD is a big topic with plenty of reference material available on the web, and people interpret different parts of it in different ways. Sure, some people may have had bad experiences with TDD depending on the culture of the organizat...
The argument against the claim is that as a species, we manage things that we don't measure all the time. You don't need to measure every hair on your head, for example, to know that you need a hair cut. The flip side of the argument says that, in fact, you are applying a broad measure...
Gojko Adzic has a great post today on the application of the 'Poka-Yoke' principle to software development. I'd bever heard of Poka-Yoke before, but it looks like it's another application of a Japanese manufacturing technique to software development. Personally, I think you have to be ...
I'm at JavaOne this week, where the talk from Sun is all about mobile, or JavaFX and JavaFX Script. I'm not sure the world needs another scripting language, but then what do I know? I know it's a bit off-topic, but the thing that struck me about JavaOne this year is just how busy it is...
In an article in the October edition of the FTP Webzine 'Upside' Peter Varhol laments the trend toward per-developer metrics in the software development process. 'Individual developer data is stored and available to be manipulated in less than honorable ways,' he says, 'and there are p...
Intellectually everyone understands that improving code quality is a good thing. After all, we know bad quality when we see it. (Anyone old enough can cast his or her mind back to the late '80s and Microsoft Word for Windows 1.0.) But we also know that there comes a point where there's...
Show me code written by ten developers and I'll show you ten different coding styles. So why try to develop and enforce coding standards? Who cares what a program looks like as long as it works
We've all experienced it - the 'get it out the door' mentality that seems to be the driving force behind many software application deliveries - a prime example of the software industry's immaturity that favors completion over quality, and an end user's preference for hot new features o...
In the conclusion of a two-part series, Enerjy Software CEO Nigel Cheshire outlines source code control systems, static code checking software, testing frameworks, and coverage tools.
Bad code abounds, and the cost to fix it is expensive. A 2002 federal study found that software errors and bugs in code cost the U.S. economy nearly $60 billion a year. And a study conducted by The Standish Group reports a 27-month backlog on end-user requests for application enhanceme...